Stunning Pictures Of The Historical Traditional Honey Hunters Of Nepal


Andrew Newey, an award-winning UK-based travel photographer, has seized gripping photos of central Nepalese Gurung tribe members participated in a benign and early heritage — honey searching.

Twice per year, the Gurung honey seekers ascend to the bottom of deserts in central Nepal and ascend them to collect honey. They utilize exactly the very same tools which their ancestors did — hand-woven rope ladders and tangos, the extended sharp bamboo sticks that they use to decrease the honey-filled es from the surface of the cliff and drop them to baskets awaiting. After light smoke fires at the bottom of this cliff to smoke the bees out, they raise their ladders and gather their honey.

Aside from the threat of falling, they also happen to be reaping the honey of the most significant honeybee on the planet. The Himalayan honey bee could grow to be up to 3 cm (1.2 in) in length. Because of grayanotoxins in the snowy rhododendrons they feed on in the spring, their spring honey could be redeemed, and brings high prices in Japan, Korea and China. The open cliff-face es help protect the bees from predators and keeps them hot by exposing them to sun.

honey-hunters-andrew-newey-1

Twice per year, the Gurung honey seekers ascend into the bottom of deserts in central Nepal and ascend them to collect honey.

honey-hunters-andrew-newey-6

honey-hunters-andrew-newey-2

They utilize exactly the very same tools which their ancestors did — hand-woven rope ladders and tangos, the extended sharp bamboo sticks that they use to decrease the honey-filled es from the surface of the cliff.

honey-hunters-andrew-newey-8

honey-hunters-andrew-newey-3

honey-hunters-andrew-newey-4

honey-hunters-andrew-newey-5

Honey hunting is one of the earliest known human pursuits. There’s an 8,000-year old cave painting in Spain which portrays a guy climbing vines to collect honey.

honey-hunters-andrew-newey-7

Aside from the threat of falling, they also happen to be reaping the honey of the most significant honeybee on the planet.   The Himalayan honey bee could grow to be up to 3 cm (1.2 in) in length.

honey-hunters-andrew-newey-9

honey-hunters-andrew-newey-13

Because of grayanotoxins in the snowy rhododendrons they feed on in the spring, their spring honey could be intoxicating, and brings high prices in Japan, Korea and China.

honey-hunters-andrew-newey-14


Like it? Share with your friends!

73
100 shares, 73 points

Comments 0

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *